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Falinge Park High School

Opening Doors; Unlocking Potential

Religious Education (RE)

Ms S. Searle – Subject Lead RE

“Science investigates; religion interprets. Science gives man knowledge, which is power; religion gives man wisdom, which is control. Science deals mainly with facts; religion deals mainly with values. The two are not rivals.” 

– Martin Luther King Jnr

Compelling Learning in Religious Education

The Study of Religious Education at Falinge Park High School gives pupils awareness of the society in which they live. It allows them to become more aware of current issues and different religious traditions locally in Rochdale, nationally and globally.

The study of different religious traditions/non-religious viewpoints allows pupils at Falinge Park High School to ask questions about their own beliefs about God and the beliefs of others. Pupils are given opportunities for deeper reflection, the chance to critically analyse, to discover what is important to them, consider issues of right and wrong and importantly to develop respect and sensitivity for diversity in our communities.

Religious teachings and practices are taught in a way which ‘encourages pupils to develop their sense of identity and belonging’.

Our RE curriculum reflects our ‘Falinge Family’ – We might be from different backgrounds, be of different races, have different religious or no religious views, but we are all one community, learning to respect and celebrate our differences.

Curriculum

Year 10
GCSE Religious Studies – AQA Specification (A) 
Religion and Life

Students study religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to the issues that follow, and their impact and influence in the modern world. They become aware of contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society on all of these issues.

They are able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following sub-categories with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and Islam:

  • Creation
  • Environmental issues
  • Abortion.
  • Euthanasia.
  • Animal experimentation
  • Life after death

 

Religion, Human Rights and Social Justice

Students study religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to the issues that follow, and their impact and influence in the modern world. They become aware of contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society on all of these issues.

They are able to explain contrasting beliefs on the following three issues with reference to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and Islam:

  • Human Rights and violations of these
  • Status of women in religion
  • The uses of wealth and poverty
  • Freedom of religious expression

Year 11
GCSE Religious Studies – AQA: Specification A (In depth study of religions)

Christianity: Beliefs, Teachings & Practices 

Students should study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity specified below and their basis in Christian sources of wisdom and authority. They are be able to refer to scripture and/or sacred texts where appropriate.

Students should study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies.

Common and divergent views within Christianity in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed are included throughout. Students refer to a range of different Christian perspectives in their answers including Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant.

Beliefs and teachings

Key beliefs

  •  The nature of God:
  •  Different Christian beliefs about creation including the role of Word and Spirit (John 1:1-3 and Genesis 1:1-3).
  •  Different Christian beliefs about the afterlife and their importance, including: resurrection and life after death; judgement, heaven and hell.

Jesus Christ and salvation

  • Beliefs and teachings about:
  • the incarnation and Jesus as the Son of God
  • the crucifixion, resurrection and ascension
  • sin, including original sin
  • the means of salvation, including law, grace and Spirit
  • the role of Christ in salvation including the idea of atonement.

Practices

Worship and festivals

  • Different forms of worship and their significance.
  • Prayer and its significance, including the Lord’s Prayer, set prayers and informal prayer.
  • The role and meaning of the sacraments.
  • The role and importance of pilgrimage and celebrations including.

The role of the church in the local and worldwide community

  • The role of the Church in the local community, including food banks and street pastors.
  • The place of mission, evangelism and Church growth.
  • The importance of the worldwide Church including.

 

Islam: Beliefs, Teachings & Practices

Students study the beliefs, teachings and practices of Islam specified below and their basis in Islamic sources of wisdom and authority. They are able to refer to scripture and other writings where appropriate.

Students study the influence of the beliefs, teachings and practices studied on individuals, communities and societies.

Common and divergent views within Islam in the way beliefs and teachings are understood and expressed are included throughout. Students refer to a range of different Muslim perspectives in their answers, including those from Sunni and Shi’a Islam. They study the specific differences identified below.

Beliefs and teachings

Key Beliefs

  • The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam and five roots of Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam, including key similarities and differences.
  • Tawhid (the Oneness of God), Qur’an Surah 112.
  • The nature of God: omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice/Adalat in Shi’a Islam, including different ideas about God’s relationship with the world: immanence and transcendence.
  • Angels, their nature and role, including Jibril and Mika’il.
  • Predestination and human freedom and its relationship to the Day of Judgement.
  • Akhirah (life after death), human responsibility and accountability, resurrection, heaven and hell.

Authority

  • Risalah (Prophethood) including the role and importance of Adam, Ibrahim and Muhammad.
  • The holy books.
  • The imamate in Shi’a Islam: its role and significance.

Practices

Worship

  • Five Pillars of Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam (students should study the Five Pillars and jihad in both Sunni and Shi’a Islam and the additional duties of Shi’a Islam).
  • Shahadah: declaration of faith and its place in Muslim practice.
  • Salah and its significance: how and why Muslims pray including times, directions, ablution (wudu), movements (rak’ahs) and recitations; salah in the home and mosque and elsewhere; Friday prayer: Jummah; key differences in the practice of salah in Sunni and Shi’a Islam, and different Muslim views about the importance of prayer.

Duties and festivals

  • Sawm: the role and significance of fasting during the month of Ramadan including origins, duties, benefits of fasting, the exceptions and their reasons, and the Night of Power, Qur’an 96:1-5.
  • Zakah: the role and significance of giving alms including origins, how and why it is given, benefits of receipt, Khums in Shi’a Islam.
  • Hajj: the role and significance of the pilgrimage to Makkah including origins, how hajj is performed, the actions pilgrims perform at sites including the Ka’aba at Makkah, Mina, Arafat, Muzdalifah and their significance.
  • Jihad: different understandings of jihad: the meaning and significance of greater and lesser jihad; origins, influence and conditions for the declaration of lesser jihad.
  • Festivals and commemorations and their importance for Muslims in Great Britain today, including the origins and meanings of Id-ul-Adha, Id-ul-Fitr, Ashura.

Enrichment

 

  • We feel passionately, that in order to learn about different religions and to respect their place in our lives we need to experience them.  
  • We currently have a cohort of pupils who are studying for an extra-curricular qualification; The Archbishop of York Award which encourages pupils to be the change in the world they want to see.
  • We take pupils on ‘faith trails’ and are planning a visit to Manchester Cathedral, The Muslim Youth Foundation and the Manchester Jewish Museum to see faith in action.
  • We have a weekly meeting of ‘Urban Faith’ where our neighbours from Open Door Church visit and hold discussions and debates about current affairs topics, act out random acts of kindness and play games with pupils.
  • We are planning a ‘Big Questions’ event where pupils can put their own questions to faith leaders and other leaders from the local area.
  • Yearly, we mark FairTrade fortnight, and we have been awarded with FairTrade status as recognition for the hard work in this area.
  • Study support sessions are available with the team for Year 11 GCSE pupils.